Stella writes… they tell us to lie

 

Today, Seniors at Risk introduces a new series about one family’s journey through the health care system as they try to protect their elderly father from institutional elder abuse. Daughter Stella chronicles their story and her views of the Canadian health care system and its impact on her dad Charlie. Stella Writes will appear regularly on Seniors at Risk.

Stella writes

 
I live in British Columbia, Canada.  We have a government health care system administered province by province.  Some years back, our provincial government set up regional health authorities and new rules were put in place.  Since then, patients and their families have been playing ‘catch up’ as we struggle to learn what this all means.
 
I have an elderly father in a senior’s facility and our family has lost all control of him.  My dad Charlie has been diagnosed with dementia, been placed under Adult Guardianship and (more…)

Videos show nursing staff assaulting defenceless patients

U.S. prosecutes abuse by health care providers, Canada turns a blind eye

 

Shocking video flashed across Canada several weeks ago showing nursing staff forcibly injecting powerful antipsychotic drugs into the body of a bound and hooded, but calm, teenage girl, “without her consent and for no apparent reason,”  (Toronto Star).  By law, and by common sense, prescription drugs are to be administered only when there is a clinical indication that they will have a beneficial therapeutic effect.

Ashley Smith entered Canada’s youth health care/prison system at the age of 14 for the crime of throwing crab apples at a postman. After several years of “treatment”, much or most of it in solitary confinement, debilitated by forced prescription drugs, Ashley strangled herself while prison staff stood idly by, watching. A coroner’s inquest is underway.

We associate state beatings, torture, or injecting drugs into a person as punishment or threat, with the brutality of the Soviet Gulag, or the depravity of the U.S. military prison Abu Ghraib, or modern-day China’s organ harvesting from still-live prisoners. But this is Canada, this is today. We ought to be shocked, ashamed, and galvanized into acting.

What if young Ashley Smith had been an elderly woman in a Canadian nursing home or care facility instead of a jail?

There would likely be no video evidence recorded to reveal the brutal treatment by health care providers. Ashley Smith’s plight would have been hidden, her death unnoticed, unreported and unpunished.

Why? In Canada, mandatory video surveillance in prisons is designed to protect both inmates and staff.  However, elderly citizens in Canadian hospitals and nursing homes have no such protection. Instead, unlike the U.S. (see below), Canadian governments and courts vigorously prohibit video surveillance inside the hospital and nursing home rooms (more…)

Regulator of Physicians hides details of doctor misconduct

 

We used to trust our doctors. In fact at one time, doctors were so trusted, we gave them the right to regulate themselves through provincial Colleges of Physicians and Surgeons. Our courts defer to their judgment, and assume doctors automatically possess profound knowledge, impeccable skills and unassailable integrity.
 
But, Canadian doctors have squandered the public’s (admittedly naïve) trust. In Canada today, many people fear doctors and the health care system, and with increasingly good reasons.
 
Today, we bring you two chilling stories, one from Ontario and one from British Columbia, that demonstrate how doctors have lost our trust.

College of Physicians and Surgeons keeps secret the details of incompetence

October 22, 2012

An Ontario surgeon found guilty of professional misconduct and incompetence, including causing death, has been allowed to continue to see patients while details of his infractions are kept secret from the public.

The Ontario College of Physicians and Surgeons is resisting revealing the details about the 22 instances of misconduct and incompetence that they confirmed, stating:  “the disciplinary committee’s ‘rules of procedure’ allow (more…)

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